menagerie

amaloli:

fun tip: say ‘another gender’ instead of ‘the opposite gender’ and crush the binary beneath your feet

(Source: bwd)

my friend has a store with g*psy in the name and i want to tell her it's not okay and advise her to change the name. but it's her brand and i'm not Romani, so i don't know how to go about it. i've never said anything about it to her before.
Anonymous

weareallmixedup:

geekzyllah:

weareallmixedup:

Tell her that g*psy is a racial slur and has always been a racial slur. Decent people don’t use slurs as the name of their brand or store. Using g*psy as part of your store name/ brand name/ in regular conversation etc. etc. hurts real people, using it nonchalantly as part of the name of a store perpetuates its casual use, don’t promote the casual use of a racist slur.

- Melody

It’s gross and horrible and we all fucking hate it, too, so there’s that.

Basically this anon, if your friend can’t understand why using a racial slur as part of her brand is wrong you should probably drop her.

- Melody

People often talk about how their preferred educational method (be that traditional schooling, homeschooling, or unschooling) teaches children “how to learn.”

With unschooling, children learn how to learn, I’ve heard more than once.

I appreciate the sentiment, but it doesn’t really sit right with me. Mostly because it seems to be minimizing the natural drive humans have to learn and explore and create. It’s taking away from something I believe to be innate, by making it something external that has to be done to children. Even with the gentler “learning how to learn” version, it still seems to imply that this learning must be sought from some external source.

If this were the case, I don’t think people would learn to walk or talk, interact positively with others, or any of those other things that babies and small children manage just fine long before they’ve had a chance to learn how to learn. They manage to learn anyway.

bebinn:

mysalivaismygifttotheworld:

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

I try to do this every day I go to nursery and gosh it makes me so happy to see it done elsewhere.

Yes, consent is nonsexual, too!

Not only that, but one of the reasons many child victims of sexual abuse don’t reach out is that they don’t have the understanding or words for what is happening to them, and why it isn’t okay. Teaching kids about consent helps them build better relationships and gives them the tools to seek help if they or a friend need our protection.

Punk’s Not Dead!

Punk’s Not Dead!

(Source: tra-nsparent)

thewyldehunt:

terecita:

31 WITCH MOVIES

to lead up to halloween here are all kinds of movies all about witchcraft. funny movies, sad movies, scary movies, vaguely historically inaccurate movies. movies that are not explicitly about witches (this isn’t a very large genre ok)

  1. häxan: witchcraft through the ages (1922)
  2. i married a witch (1942)
  3. black sunday (1960)
  4. horror hotel (1960)
  5. witchfinder general (1968)
  6. bedknobs and broomsticks (1971)
  7. the devils (1971)
  8. simon, king of the witches (1971)
  9. suspiria (1977)
  10. inferno (1980)
  11. return to oz (1985)
  12. the witches of eastwick (1987)
  13. kiki’s delivery service (1989)
  14. teen witch (1989)
  15. warlock (1989)
  16. the witches (1990)
  17. death becomes her (1992)
  18. hocus pocus (1993)
  19. the bride with white hair (1993)
  20. witch hunt (1994)
  21. lord of illusions (1995)
  22. the craft (1996)
  23. practical magic (1998)
  24. ginger snaps (2000)
  25. bewitched (2005)
  26. the woods (2006)
  27. solstice (2008)
  28. the house of the devil (2009)
  29. beautiful creatures (2013)
  30. hansel & gretel: witch hunters (2013)
  31. ek thi daayan (2013)
1. if you ever want to wear mommy’s make-up, just make sure you don’t eat it. when it’s time to go to bed, I will help you wash it off.

2. when school starts and you want to jump rope instead of play kickball, be careful not to trip and hurt your knees.

3. if you grow up and a boy makes your heart hurt, you do not have to be ashamed.

4. if you fall in love with a girl
who wears the same clothes
as you, it will be easy for me to buy you both presents.

5. if I teach you anything, I will teach you to be gentle.

6. you are not Atlas and the world
is not a burden for you to carry.

7. if you do not like your body, if you feel like you were put inside the wrong one, I will stand by and watch you become again.

8. because we are human beings and we do not always have to
take what we are given.

9. I will love you constantly, fervently, always.

10. I will teach you the value of
the word “no” so that, when you hear it, you do not question it.

11. when the war comes
and you want to fight, I will
sleep with clenched fists until you come home to me.

12. when the war comes and you don’t want to go, I will sleep soundly.

13. you are allowed to be soft. you are allowed to break and bend. you do not have to be strong. you do not have to be a soldier.
“
a letter to my future son | Caitlyn S. (via riseabovethemadness)

(Source: alonesomes)

theshyvelociraptor:

death-by-lulz:

tastefullyoffensive:

Cats Taking Selfies 2

This is the best thing I’ve seen all night.

returnthegayze:

until the age of five i refused
to wear anything but floral print —
something about the pink, the purple
the jeweled and bedazzled, the lisa frank
brought me closer to my sister:
she the one i’d tell everyone
i wanted to be when i grew up
(still do)

never learned how to pee standing…